Skip to main content

About your Search

20110701
20110731
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
here. >> that's my question. can pakistan's military take on the taliban and militancy without u.s. money and resources, reza? >> reporter: well, look. they have a big army. 600,000 soldiers. it's one of the biggest armies of the world. they are not the best trained army, not the most proficient when it comes to fighting and insurgency. fighting that the taliban, that they've needed the help of the u.s. in the past, but, again, they're saying they don't need the help anymore. they're going to continue to fight without the u.s.' help. but it doesn't square with previous statements made in the past. previous demands for the u.s. to give them more money, give them resources, claims that they need help. now they say they don't need help. i think this is gamesmanship and i think all of this really underscores a troubled relationship, but i think what's important to point out is though the relationship is hurting there is no indication that it will end. both countries realize that they need one another so i think there are indications that it will stagger forward despite the troubles.
several months have been like? the taliban has been exerting its influence in the area. how has it been for you? >> for me and my men it's been quite busy. getting out there, getting after it. we've been steadily, you know, helping the afghan people here. we've been promoting a lot of projects, a lot of schools, getting out there every day. >> also, congratulations on that promotion. >> thank you. >> also, much has been said about the draw down. you and some of your men will be leaving in just a few weeks. how do you feel about that? because there's been, you know, politically there's been discussions on both sides, some saying it's time for the draw down, others saying not the time for it. >> you know it's very exciting for us. it's about time about time we start looking at a draw plan and getting back to our families. we've been at it about ten years now. >> long time. >> long time. and, you know, it's about time the afghan people start taking responsibility of their country. >> it is the fourth of july, i know you guys, you're able to have some of the fourth of july barbecue lunch to
for taliban. he came back to harvard, but in 2009 with the national guard unit, he went back to afghanistan. >> whoa! >> damn! >> i spent a lot of time with rout clearance units looking for ieds and we got hit several times and vehicles in front of me blown up. my vehicle never got hit. i was very, very lucky. when you run up there and pull open the door and see your injured buddies, you'll never forget that site. >> reporter: this time, back home, he began to explore the science of brain injury. >> what happens when the brain gets hit by a blast wave and slams up against the inside of the skull. >> reporter: with colleagues at northeastern university, parker built new tools to study how a blast affects the brain. it could be years before this leads to new treatments, but parker hopes that eventually will have a broad impact. >> concussions that your favorite football player suffers or the head injury you get when you're in a car accident and your head snaps forward or a shaking baby syndrome. these are all examples of nonpenetrating head injuries that can cause a traumatic brain injury. >>
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)